Georg Christoph Stertzing | St. Petri Kirche . Erfurt [Germany]

web crop GeSte Erf Johannes Janeck_CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 DE

Photography by Johannes Janeck
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The organ was built in 1702 by Georg Christoph Stertzing, originally for the St. Petri monastery in Petersberg. However in 1811 it was sold in an auction due to the secularization of churches in Erfurt carried out by Prussian and French. The organ was bought by the Erfurt community for 900 Taler. At this time the instrument was installed in the Erfurt St. Petri Kirche, although the available space was very small in comparison to the organ size. A coat of arms which crowned the top had to be removed and relocated in a wall near the organ. This displacement from the monastery to the church was not the best option in terms of spatial requirements, but it ended to be an excellent choice by chance, as the St. Petri monastery was destroyed during a Prussian bombardment in 1813.

In 1998 a major repair is carried out, including a reconstruction of bellows and a general disassembly, revision and reassembly of the instrument. Wind channels were almost unusable and had to be completely dismounted and repaired in order to rescue all the possible parts. Pipework was also subjected to a complete analysis and repair.

Currently the organ is tuned in meantone temperament (according to Praetorius) and has mechanical key and stop action, with 28 stops.

 

1702 – organ construction
1811 – organ sale in auction, bought by Erfurt community
1998-2002 – organ major repair by Orgelbau Alexander Schuke

 

Oberwerk Brustwerk Pedal
Principal 8′ Principal 4′ Principal 16′
Quintaden 16′ Gedackt 8′ Sub Bass 16′
Rohrflöte 8′ Quintaden 8′ Violon 16′
Quinta 6′ Traversa 8′ Octav 8′
Octav 4′ Nachthorn 4′ Mixtur IV
Rauschpfeif II Octave 2′ Posaun 16′
Sesqaltera II Waldflöte 2′ Cornet 2′
Octav 2’ Quinta 1 1/2′
Mixtur VI Mixtur III
Cymbel III Vox Humana 8′
Trombetta 8′
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